(940) 586-1313

Judgments vs. Verdicts

If a judge tries the case, the judge’s decision is called a judgment. If a jury tries the case, the jury’s decision is called a verdict. In determining a defendant’s guilt or innocence, the judge or jury can consider only the testimony of witnesses and any evidence properly admitted during the trial. If you are found guilty by either judge or jury, the penalty will be announced at that time. Unless you plan to appeal your case, you should be prepared to pay the fine and court costs at this time.

Requesting a continuance after a trial date has been set.

If you need a continuance for your trial, you must make the request or “Motion” in writing, state your reasons for the continuance, and submit your motion to the court prior to your court date. The judge will make a decision whether or not to grant the motion. You may request a continuance for the following reasons:

  • A religious holy day where the tenets of your religious organization prohibit members from participating in secular activities such as court proceedings (you must file an affidavit with the court stating this information);
  • A witness is unable to testify in your case, after you have exercised due diligence to secure the witness’ presence at trial;
  • You feel it is necessary in order to receive a fair trial;
  • Good Cause;
  • Any other reason provided by law.